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Rosa The Mill on the Floss ('Austulliver') (PBR)

rose The Mill on the Floss

Eventual height & spread

Rosa The Mill on the Floss ('Austulliver') (PBR)

rose The Mill on the Floss

  • available to order from autumn
  • 4 litre pot
  • £24.99
Delivery options
  • Standard

This rose is deciduous so it will lose all its leaves in autumn, then fresh new foliage appears again each spring.

  • Position: full sun or lightly dappled shade
  • Soil: fertile, humus-rich, moist, well-drained soil
  • Rate of growth: fast-growing
  • Flowering period: June to September
  • Hardiness: fully hardy

    Large clusters of deeply cupped blooms form on the gently arching stems of this bushy shrub rose, filling the air with their rich, fruity perfume. Offering a long season of interest, the petals fade from mid- to pale pink, but each retains its deeper raspbery trim. A good all-rounder, it has a good resistance to diseases, and can be grown in lightly dappled shade. Use it in patio pots, or borders.

    All our roses are grown in an open field and then dug up when the weather conditions are right in October or November. Some suppliers send out their roses as 'bare root' plants (ie without pots or compost), but we pot ours up as it helps to keep the roots hydrated and in good condition. As they are dormant throughout the winter, they will not produce any new roots until spring, so don't be surprised if the compost falls away from the roots when you take them out of their pots. The roses can be kept in their pots throughout the winter provided they are kept well fed and watered, however ideally they should planted out as soon as possible. They will already have been cut back so no further pruning will be required, apart from snipping off any tips that have died back. Routine pruning can begin in late winter the year after planting.

  • Garden care: If planting in winter, choose a frost-free spell when the soil is not frozen. Roses are quite deep-rooted plants so dig a deep hole roughly twice as wide as the plants roots and mix in a generous amount of composted organic matter. A top-dressing of a general purpose fertiliser can be worked into the surrounding soil and we also recommend using Rose Rootgrow at this stage to encourage better root development. This is particularly important when planting into a bed where roses have previously been grown as Rose Rootgrow is said to combat rose sickness (aka. replant disease).

    While wearing tough gloves, prune in late winter or early spring, removing any dead, damaged or weak-looking stems completely. The younger stems tend to produce the best flowers on hybrid teas, so if the plant is becoming congested, cut one or two of the older stems right back to their base, which will also help open up the centre of the plant. Then cut back the most vigorous stems to within 10-15cm from the base, leaving four to six buds on each stem. Finally, cut the thinner stems back to within 5-10cm from the base, leaving approximately two to four buds per stem.